Board of Directors

Si Balch

Brooklin, Maine

Si retired as forest director of New England Forestry Foundation, and is now a consulting forester. He has recently traveled to Europe and Russia learning about their forest management, and is chairman of Pro Silva USA, a silvicultural program of the New England Forestry Foundation. Previously he spent over thirty years in New England's forest industry, holding the position of Chief Forester and Silviculturalist. He is a Certified Forester and Fellow with the Society of American Foresters, as well being licensed in Maine. His woodlot is part of the American Tree Farm system.


Richard G. Carbonetti

President - Newport, Vermont

Carbo serves as Vice President, Timberland Division at LandVest, Inc. His responsibilities focus on the forest management and consulting side of the business on over 1,700,000 acres in New England, New York and Pennsylvania. He previously served as the company’s Vermont Regional Forester, and was Owner and President of Round Top Woodlot Management in Albany, Vermont.

Carbo has had a leading role in both Vermont and New England forest policy discussions, including serving two terms on the Northern Forest Lands Council. He is the current national Past President of the Association of Consulting Foresters (ACF), a founding member and past Chair of the Consulting Foresters Association of Vermont, and a past executive board member of the Vermont Society of American Foresters. He also serves on Vermont’s SFI State Implementation Committee.

Carbo has lived since 1980 in Albany, VT with his wife Emily. He has two sons, Benjamin & his wife Kristen in Manchester, CT and Samuel & his fiancé Bridget in Derby, VT. Carbo and his family are tree Farmers on their Glover-Greensboro, VT timberland.


Starling Childs

Norfolk, Connecticut

Star graduated from Yale College with a degree in geology and from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, where he received his Master of Forest Science degree. After Yale, Star worked on the family Tree Farm, Great Mountain Forest, and he also started a small forestry consulting business. He subsequently co-founded Environmental and Ecological Consulting Services, Inc. (a.k.a. EECOS) along with Anthony Irving, MEM of Lyme, CT.  In addition to serving on Northern Woodlands' board, he also serves on the board of the Connecticut Forest and Park Association and is a director of Connwood Foresters, Inc. He is the President of both the Berkshire-Litchfield Environmental Council and his family's nonprofit Great Mountain Forest Corporation in Norfolk, CT. Throughout his career, Star has advocated for a balanced and science-based approach to the sustainable management of forests, associated natural resources, and the long term protection of the natural environment.


Tom Ciardelli

Hanover, New Hampshire

Prior to his retirement as a biochemist, Tom served for several years as a research chemist at the Veteran’s Administration Hospital in White River Junction, Vermont. He has also been on the faculty of Dartmouth College and the Dartmouth Medical School. Early in his career, Tom worked as an assistant research scientist at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg, Germany. He wrote over 50 scientific papers including 35 peer-reviewed publications, and was principle investigator on three Merit Review Grants from the Veteran’s Administration and five RO1 Awards from the National Institutes of Health.

Tom is an avid outdoorsman. He is on the board of trustees at the Vermont Institute of Natural Science, on the advisory board of The Upper Valley Land Trust, and has also served the Hanover Babe Ruth Baseball and the Hanover Hockey Association. He received a B.S. in Chemistry from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry at the University of New Hampshire.


Esther Cowles

Hopkinton, New Hampshire

Esther is the owner of Fernwood Consulting, LLC.  Prior to starting her own business, she was the executive director for NH Project Learning Tree for over 14 years.  Esther also worked on the regional staff for the Northern Forest Lands Council and was the planning director for the regional planning commission for northern NH.  She holds a Master’s in Education from Plymouth State College and a BA in Economics from UNH.  She is married with a ‘tweener daughter and enjoys horseback riding, hiking, kayaking, and walking in the woods.


Dicken Crane

Dalton, Massachusetts

Dicken Crane, is a farmer, licensed timber harvester, proponent of sustainable forest management, President of the Board of Massachusetts Forest Landowners Association, and a Trustee of Massachusetts Environmental Trust. He is an expert on biomass burned directly in the form of wood, grass, and pellets, for electricity and heat.


James Curtis

Andover, Massachusetts

Jim is President of Cooperstown Environmental LLC, an environmental consulting firm in Andover, Massachusetts. A Registered Professional Engineer in Maine, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts as well as a Licensed Site Professional (LSP) in Massachusetts, he has worked in the environmental field for 30 years. He is the acknowledged authority on the Massachusetts Brownfields Tax Credit, a state program to encourage the redevelopment of contaminated sites into productive reuse. Jim is also the owner of several solar photovoltaic systems that collectively produce over 700,000 kwH annually.

Jim is also the founder and CFO of Curtis Woodlands LLC, which owns about 650 acres of woodlands managed for long-term timber production. He was trained as a New York Master Forest Owner in 1995 and is a lifelong fisherman, deer hunter, and ginseng hunter.

A graduate of Princeton University (BSE – Civil Engineering) and Northeastern University (MS – Civil Engineering), he is the author or co-author of three books and numerous technical articles and speaks frequently on environmental topics. He is active on municipal boards and commissions, professional associations, and a Board member of the Massachusetts Fiscal Alliance and a long-time supporter of the Institute for Justice. He lives in Andover with his wife Susan and has two children in college.


Celia Evans

Paul Smiths, New York

Celia Evans is a Professor of Ecology at Paul Smith’s College in the Adirondack Park of New York State. She is an ecologist, educator, singer/songwriter who uses “place” to contextualize her science teaching and songwriting.  

Celia’s ecological research has included beech bark disease impacts on forest structure, snowshoe hare browse behavior: the role of plant chemical defenses and habitat, the response of invasive and native aquatic plants to water temperature in a changing climate, and the factors that structure peatland plant communities. Following a dissertation in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Dartmouth College she did post-doctorate in Science Education at the University of New Hampshire. Since then, she has stayed active in science education in her own classes and by working with K-12 teachers to allow them to develop standards-based inquiry and place-based curricula in a variety of workshop formats. She spent three months in 2012 on a teaching/research Fulbright scholarship in the Altai Republic in the Russian Federation.  There she worked with students at Gorno-Altaisk State University and conducted research with a Russian colleague on rural elementary school students’ cultural relationship to place by examining the relative strengths of formal (school) and informal (family, community, and media) factors that influence their attachment to place and ecological literacy in the Altai and in the Adirondacks. Lately, along with teaching and research she has been dabbling with journalistic style writing in magazines and local newspapers about her science and education research interests and passions.  

Celia has released five original albums. Much of the music gets its inspiration from the environment, landscapes, and people of cold rocky northern places.  Recently she was involved in a recording project and PBS documentary entitled ‘Songs to Keep’ Treasures of an Adirondack Folk Collector.  The music project was funded by a grant to TAUNY (Traditional Arts in Upstate New York) and the video chronicles the life of Champlain Valley historian Marjorie Lansing Porter who collected Adirondack folk songs  in the 1940s and 1950s. Several Adirondack-based musicians were asked to choose a song from the original recorded collection. On the album and in the video, Evans sings the lumber camp song ‘Cutting Down the Pines.’ The video project was directed by Paul Larson and won an Emmy Award for the production.


Timothy Fritzinger

London, United Kingdom

Timo is a Director of Investments at Alta Advisers, a family investment office based in London. He oversees Alta’s real asset investment program, including investments in real estate, energy, and timberlands. Prior to Alta, Timo was a principal with FLAG Capital Management and senior research consultant for Cambridge Associates, LLC, both in Boston, MA.

Timo’s forestry work includes nearly six years as acquisitions analyst for Hancock Timber Resources Group, where he evaluated timberland investments throughout the US and New Zealand, and summer stints with The Forestland Group in Chapel Hill, NC and as an assistant forester on a private Adirondack reserve during graduate school.  Timo began his career working in the Federal Affairs Office for the Trust for Public Land in Washington, D.C..

Timo serves on the board of the Adirondack Trail Improvement Society and is a member of the Boston Security Analysts Society and the CFA Institute. He earned his B.A. degree in history, with Studies in the Environment double major, from Yale University, later obtaining a Master’s Degree in Forestry and a Master’s Degree in Business Administration with a concentration in finance, also from Yale University.


Mike Jurnak

Manchester, New Hampshire

Mike is a Principal at BerryDunn, the largest certified public accounting and management consulting firm in Northern New England with over 300 employees, where he leads the commercial practice group firm-wide as well as manages the firm’s Manchester office. Mike focuses on serving closely-held and family-owned commercial clients, including manufacturing, hospitality and technology businesses. He provides financial reporting, merger and acquisition structuring, internal controls and systems development, and strategic planning services for clients throughout New England.

Mike also works with clients who utilize natural resources such as timber and renewable resources in pursuit of their business objectives. As co-chair of New Hampshire Businesses for Social Responsibility, he sees firsthand how businesses can make positive change adopting sustainable business practices.   

A former volunteer fire-fighter, Mike is also an avid outdoor enthusiast who pursues activities such as hiking, kayaking, biking, and fishing the countless streams and lakes of New England.  He also continues to make an annual trip to deer camp though it’s more for the social aspects.  Mike lives in Bedford, New Hampshire with his wife Colette and has a son attending high school and a daughter in college.


Kenneth R. Kinder

East Haverhill, New Hampshire

Ken earned a Bachelor of Science and a Master of Science from the University of New Hampshire and is active in charitable and conservation organizations. Ken is a financial advisor with a major financial services firm, is currently a Director of the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation, and a member of The Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests’ Reservation Stewardship Committee. Ken most enjoys managing and exploring his 300+ acres of forest lands in East Haverhill, New Hampshire, with his wife, Amy, and daughters, Maggie and Lily.


Kim Royar

Vice President - Wallingford, Vermont

Kim is currently the Special Assistant to the Commissioner of Fish and Wildlife.  Prior to moving to the central office, she was a wildlife biologist with the Department of Fish and Wildlife for 30 years. She began her career with the Department as a habitat biologist providing technical assistance to private landowners with the goal of enhancing wildlife habitat on private lands. She became the furbearer project leader in 1991 and in that role was responsible for the conservation and management of Vermont’s 14 furbearer species. To that end she has worked with trappers to promote humane, safe, and efficient trapping practices. Kim’s other passion has been working with private landowner organizations such as Coverts and Vermont Woodland Owners Association to promote wildlife habitat enhancement, education, and conservation on private lands. In addition, she has participated as part of a team working to manage state owned lands for wildlife and public enjoyment.

Kim lives in Wallingford, Vermont with her husband and has two grown children. They enjoy owning, managing, and stewarding a parcel of forestland a mile from their house. In her limited ‘down’ time she likes to hike, hunt, canoe, and spend time with her family.  Kim is committed to the conservation of all wildlife species and their habitats for future generations of Vermonters.


Robert Saul

Amherst, Massachusetts

Bob is a Managing Director at Wood Creek. He spent fifteen years as a Partner and Director of Northern Hemisphere Investments at GMO Renewable Resources (GMO RR) in Boston. He recently joined Wood Creek Capital as a Managing Director for land-based investments. At GMO RR, Mr. Saul invested more than $2 billion in forestry and agricultural properties in 21 States and several Latin America countries. In addition to these acquisitions, Mr. Saul completed more than $1 billion in dispositions to complete the round trip process for six of the eight funds he managed. He brings a broad base of operational experience to Wood Creek as well as firsthand knowledge of complex contractual arrangements with joint venture partners, environmental groups, and county, state, and federal agencies. Mr. Saul owns 200 acres of farmland in New Hampshire and western Massachusetts and is a board member of the Hitchcock Center for the Environment. He is a graduate of Amherst College (B.A English, '81) and Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government (MPP '85).


Peter M. Silberfarb

Norwich, Vermont

Peter is the Raymond Sobel professor of psychiatry, emeritus; a professor of medicine, emeritus; and chairman emeritus of the department of psychiatry at Dartmouth Medical School and the Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center.  He is well known nationally through his tenure as president of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and president of the American Association of Chairmen of Departments of Psychiatry.  He also has served as a director of the American Board of Family Practice, and on the executive councils of the American Psychosomatic Society, the American Board of Medical Specialties, and the scientific council of the American Cancer Society. His research and publications are focused at the interface of medicine and psychiatry, especially on the emotional consequences of cancer and the effects of cancer treatment on cognition.  He is known internationally in these areas and has served as a consultant to the World Health Organization and the Max Planck Research Institute. Peter and his wife, Anne, are retired and live in Norwich, Vermont. Both have served on the boards of the Vermont Institute of Natural Science and the Vermont chapter of the Nature Conservancy. They have two married children. Their 200 acre woodlot is located in Sharon, Vermont and is in current use.  They have selectively logged it and have utilized the WHIP program to build vernal pools, eradicate invasive species, release apple trees, and establish patch cuts.